This podcast is designed to give you a basic understanding of God, the Bible, and Christian beliefs. J. Dwight Pentecost said, “There is no higher activity in which the mind may be engaged than the pursuit of the knowledge of God.”

Today’s passage of Scripture is Romans 5:5 which reads: “And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.”

Today’s words from a theologian are from Robert McAfee Brown. He said: “The Church cannot be content to live in its stained-glass house and throw stones through the picture window of modern culture.”

Our first topic for today is titled “How Does God Work in the World? (Part 1)” from the book, “Understanding Theology in 15 Minutes a Day” by Dr. Daryl Aaron.

The Bible teaches that, having created the universe, God continues to be at work in it. He does not abandon it or leave it to operate on its own; rather, he continues to be intimately and actively involved. This is generally known as the doctrine of divine providence, which, more specifically, is regularly described by means of three related ideas.

Our second topic for today is titled “Theology of the Synoptics (Part 6)” from “The Moody Handbook of Theology” by Dr. Paul Enns.

— Introduction to Synoptic Theology: Mark

Author. The early church gave strong witness to John Mark’s authorship of the second gospel. Papias, writing at about A.D. 150, stated: “Mark, having become the interpreter of Peter, wrote down accurately everything that he remembered.” Irenaeus, writing about A.D. 185, stated: “Now after their decease (Peter and Paul), Mark, the disciple and interpreter of Peter, also handed down to us in writing what Peter had preached.”


Daniel Whyte III
Daniel Whyte III

Our Scripture verse on preaching is John 3:16-17 which reads: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”

Our quote on preaching today is from D.L. Moody. He said, “The preaching that this world needs most is the sermons in shoes that are walking with Jesus Christ.”

In this podcast, we are using as our texts, the following three books: “Lectures to My Students” by Charles H. Spurgeon; “The Preacher and his Preaching” by Alfred P. Gibbs; and “Biblical Preaching” by Haddon W. Robinson. And, I want to remind you to take advantage of our special offer. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to purchase any one of these books for your personal library from the resources page on our website — PodcastPulpit.com.

Today, our topic is titled “Tools of the Trade, Part 11” from “Biblical Preaching” by Haddon W. Robinson.

We are continuing our look at the various resources that are available to help preachers understand the context of a passage. Today, we are looking at Commentaries.

— Commentaries

As you teach the Scriptures, you need teachers to teach you. Through commentaries, scholars serve the church. They offer a wealth of information about the meaning of words, backgrounds of passages, and the argument of a writer. As a general rule, it is wiser (and cheaper!) to select the best volumes on individual Bible books from several different series. It is also helpful to consult an assortment of commentaries on a passage and weigh what they say against each other in determining the meaning of the biblical author. For your basic study you will want to consult commentaries based on the original languages and not only on the English text. Several bibliographies exist to guide you in your selection consult commentaries based on the original languages and not only on the English text. Several bibliographies exist to guide you in your selection of a library.

For your initial study you will be helped by consulting commentaries based on the original languages. Volumes in the International Critical Commentary series or the Word Biblical Commentary series are examples of this category. These are often quite technical and require some knowledge of the original languages, but they wrestle with the meaning of the text.

You will also want to consult expositional commentaries. They are much more English-friendly, but be sure to select those written by authors who work from the original languages. InterVarsity’s Tyndale Old Testament Commentary series or Zondervan’s Expositor’s Bible Commentary series would be typical of this group.

You will find additional help in commentaries that focus on application, such as the NIV Application Commentaries on both the Old and the New Testaments or the IVP New Testament Commentaries. These volumes also deal with exegesis and exposition, but sometimes not at the same depth as the critical or expositional commentaries.

There are many books and tapes of sermons preached by well-known preachers. Although these may give you some ideas of how to approach or apply your sermon, they should not be used early in your preparation. You will be tempted to rely too heavily on them and therefore short-circuit your own study of the text.

Let’s Pray —

As we close, I want to speak to those who have never truly accepted Jesus Christ as their Savior as well as those who have doubts about their salvation. Allow me to share with you how you can receive Jesus Christ as your Saviour today.

First, accept the fact that you are a sinner, and that you have broken God’s law. The Bible says in Romans 3:23: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.”

Second, accept the fact that there is a penalty for sin. The Bible states in Romans 6:23: “For the wages of sin is death…”

Third, accept the fact that you are on the road to hell. Jesus Christ said in Matthew 10:28: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” Also, the Bible states in Revelation 21:8: “But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.”

Now this is bad news, but here’s the good news. Jesus Christ said in John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can live eternally with Him. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will.

Romans 10:9 & 13 says, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved… For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” Pray and ask Him to come into your heart and He will.

May God bless you and keep you. And, until next time, PROCLAIM the Good News!


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.

The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is 2 Timothy 2:15 which says, “Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Dee Ward Hock. He said, “If you don’t understand that you work for your mislabeled ‘subordinates,’ then you know nothing of leadership.”

Our topic today is part 7 of “Chapter 3: Reality — Keep it Real” from “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning. He continues as follows:

— Your Sunday Best

It is the value of reality that leads a Deliberately Simple church to encourage casual, comfortable dress. I always wear blue jeans to church. I do this because the average person in America owns eight pairs of blue jeans, so I consider them to be the least common denominator of fashion. The fashion statement (or under-statement) that I make communicates something beyond the rivets and five pockets. It says, “We’re not here to impress you, so please don’t waste any effort trying to impress us.”

Casual dress is not superficial; it’s important. It’s about being true to yourself and your ideas. We have neither the time nor the inclination for pretense. When clothing is allowed to convey class status within an organization, a hierarchical structure built on rank and position is perpetuated.

Our Scripture verse on preaching is 2 Timothy 4:2 which reads: “Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all long suffering and doctrine.”

Our quote on preaching today is from Jerry Bridges. He said, “Preach the Gospel to yourself every day.”

Today, our topic is titled “The Qualifications of the Preacher, Part 26” from “The Preacher and his Preaching” by Alfred P. Gibbs.

This section is titled: HE MUST BE FIT FOR THE WORK (PART 11)

As preachers, we must recognize that our bodies, too, are the Lord’s. The Bible puts it thus, “Now the body is not for fornication, but for the Lord and the Lord for the body.” The Christian’s body belongs to the Lord, as does everything else pertaining to him. Nothing could be plainer, “Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, which is in you, which ye have of God and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God’s.”

Seeing that our bodies do not belong to us, but that we are merely tenants in them for the duration of our lifetime on earth, what should our attitude be in regard to our bodies? The Word of God leaves us in no doubt as to the answer. We are urged, first of all, to yield our bodies for a righteous life. “Yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members [i.e., hands, feet, tongue, etc.] as instruments of righteousness unto God.”


Daniel Whyte III
Daniel Whyte III

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Mark 10:42-44 which says, “Ye know that they which are accounted to rule over the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and their great ones exercise authority upon them. But so shall it not be among you: but whosoever will be great among you, shall be your minister: And whosoever of you will be the chiefest, shall be servant of all.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from John Izzo and Marshall Goldsmith. He said, “Leadership is a posture and a choice, not a role that must be bestowed on you. Step up and be a leader when no one is watching or expecting you to do so.”

In this podcast, we are going through the fine books: “Advanced Strategic Planning: A New Model for Church and Ministry Leaders” by Aubrey Malphurs, “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning, and “Humilitas: A Lost Key to Life, Love, and Leadership” by John Dickson. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to purchase a copy of these books from our website podcastpulpit.com.

Our topic today is part 3 of “Chapter 3: Preparing the Boat: Developing the Strategy” from “Advanced Strategic Planning: A New Model for Church and Ministry Leaders” by Aubrey Malphurs. He continues as follows:

— Developing a Strategic Plan

Now that we know why development is important, what it is, and who is responsible to make it happen, we turn to the practice of strategic development. It will tell us how to design the Strategy plan (big S). This involves pursuing a four-step strategic development process.

Anytime you attempt to execute a process, there will be certain barriers that get in the way and attempt to block it. I define them as embedded practices, policies, or persons (anything or anyone) that block the effective activation of your strategic plan. You will run headlong into them both in the development process and especially in its implementation, when you launch your developed strategic plan. Thus I have included some information on how to identify and deal with these barriers in chapter 13 under “Some Important Implementation Practices.” Should you encounter barriers as you take the following steps, use the information there to deal with them.

Step 1. Formulate Development Objectives with Goals

The very first part of the process is to formulate the objectives and their specific goals needed to effectively develop the mini-strategies that make up the overall ministry Strategy. We at The Malphurs Group have come up with eleven objectives. They are prayer, congregational communication, community outreach, disciple making, congregational mobilization, staffing, board development, setting (location and facilities), finances or stewardship, creativity and innovation, and leader development. Each of these objectives could have five to twenty or more goals. To see the goals for each of these objectives, turn to the Strategic Development Worksheet in appendix D. You may need to adjust each objective and its goals to your particular context. In your context you may want to come up with other objectives.

Before formulating specific goals, it is wise to understand the characteristics of good goals. There are at least five. They are clear — people understand what they are. They are urgent, important to the ministry, and need to have been accomplished yesterday. They are visible — people can see something taking place right before their eyes. They are meaningful and important to people. They are timely and can be accomplished quickly. Thus they lead to short-term as well as long-term wins.

Five Characteristics of Good Goals
1. Clear
2. Urgent
3. Visible
4. Meaningful
5. Timely

Step 2. Recruit Development Team Leaders and Teams

Ministry is only as good as the people who lead and carry it out, and this needs to be kept in mind in this step— recruiting the teams and their leaders. Most people have a profound inner desire to accomplish something of significance with their lives. Our job as leaders is to assist our people in accomplishing this for Christ, and it can be done when people are put in positions for which they are wired. Then their gifts, passions, and temperament will help them accomplish the goals. A person with the gift of evangelism might connect with the community outreach development team (DT). Another indication is one’s profession. For example, a realtor might join the community outreach DT, or a contractor, architect, or carpenter might be on the ministry setting DT (facilities and location).

First, you will need to determine which DTs are needed and then recruit the team members. We at The Malphurs Group recommend teams for each of the objectives listed above, along with a lead development team. Thus in addition to the lead team, we recommend the following: prayer team, congregational communication team, community outreach team, disciple-making team, congregational mobilization team, staff team, ministry setting (location and facilities) team, finance or stewardship team, and creative and innovative team, which can help the church adapt quickly to change in the culture. An optional team is one that develops a governing board. This objective is optional because some churches do not have a board. Another optional team is a church leadership development team.

The pastor and others, such as the leader of the lead development team (who may be the pastor), will select and recruit from the SLT the leader or champion for each development team listed above. Do not make the mistake of asking for volunteers. It’s okay to ask for volunteers to be on a team but not for leading a team. When you ask for volunteers to lead, you may get people who are not able or competent to lead. I suspect this may be the reason Jesus selected and pursued the disciples he knew would be good leaders.

Next, the DT leaders will, in turn, select their teams (at least two but no more than nine people) from those on the SLT, who are not leading or on another team, and from people in the congregation.

Once you have in place the DT members, the team members will divvy up the goals among them. How might they know which goals each should pursue? One, as mentioned above, is the person’s divine design (gifts, passion, and temperament). A second indication might be a personal interest. Someone may not have gifting or experience in a particular area but simply be interested in the area of ministry.

If the Lord tarries his coming and we live, we will continue this topic in our next podcast.

————

— PRAYER —

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, here’s how.

First, accept the fact that you are a sinner, and that you have broken God’s law. The Bible says in Romans 3:23: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.”

Second, accept the fact that there is a penalty for sin. The Bible states in Romans 6:23: “For the wages of sin is death…”

Third, accept the fact that you are on the road to hell. Jesus Christ said in Matthew 10:28: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” Also, the Bible states in Revelation 21:8: “But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.”

Now this is bad news, but here’s the good news. Jesus Christ said in John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can live eternally with Him. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will.

Romans 10:9-13 says, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

God bless.


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.

Our Scripture verse on preaching is Romans 10:14 which reads: “How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?”

Our quote on preaching today is from Billy Sunday. He said, “I am an old-fashioned preacher of the old-time religion, that has warmed this cold world’s heart for two thousand years.”

Today, our topic is titled “The Call to Ministry, Part 14” from “Lectures to My Students” by Charles Spurgeon.

We must try whether we can endure brow-beating, weariness, slander, jeering, and hardship; and whether we can be made the off-scouring of all things, and be treated as nothing for Christ’s sake. If we can endure all these, we have some of those points which indicate the possession of the rare qualities which should meet in a true servant of the Lord Jesus Christ.

I gravely question whether some of us will find our vessels, when far out at sea, to be quite so seaworthy as we think them. O my brethren, make sure work of it while you are yet in this retreat; and diligently labor to fit yourselves for your high calling. You will have trials enough, and woe to you if you do not go forth armed from head to foot with armor of proof.

You will have to run with horsemen, let not the footmen weary you while in your preliminary studies. The devil is abroad, and with him are many.

The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Colossians 1:16 which says, “For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Jack Welch. He said, “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.”

Our topic today is part 5 of Chapter 7: “Growth: Why Humility Generates Abilities” from “Humilitas: A Lost Key to Life, Love, and Leadership” by John Dickson. He continues as follows:

Undefended Leadership

Simon Walker teaches leadership at Oxford University in the UK. He speaks of the “undefended leader”, the title of a trilogy of books he has written on the subject. He points out how frequently leaders feel the need to defend themselves publicly, whether in front of clients, executive peers or other staff. Leaders sometimes live in a hostile world, with young bucks ready to take their position at the first opportunity and stakeholders occasionally unforgiving of the smallest managerial mistake. Leaders thus imagine that appearing invincible and right is necessary for building loyalty and belief.

Our Scripture verse on preaching is 2 Timothy 4:3-4 which reads: “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.”

Our quote on preaching today is from Rick Warren. He said, “When the idea you’re talking about becomes a person you care about, it changes how you preach.”

Today, our topic is titled “Tools of the Trade, Part 10” from “Biblical Preaching” by Haddon W. Robinson.

— Context, continued

It’s amazing how much of the Bible you can learn by simply reading it in English, but some knowledge of the original languages does give you an advantage. Reading a passage in Hebrew or Greek is like watching TV in high definition. It adds vividness and precision to the picture. You need not be an expert in the Hebrew or Greek languages to use them with benefit, and almost anyone can use some of the available linguistic tools. Accuracy, as well as integrity, demands that we develop every possible skill to keep us from declaring in the name of God what the Holy Spirit never intended to convey.

Up to this point we have been looking at the biblical text itself, both in English and possibly in the original languages, to try to determine the overall idea of the passage by asking questions to clarify what we do not understand. Now we can use tools to help us dig into the passage. At least seven different aids are available to help us as we examine our text.

The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Titus 1:7-9 which says, “For a bishop must be blameless, as the steward of God; not selfwilled, not soon angry, not given to wine, no striker, not given to filthy lucre; But a lover of hospitality, a lover of good men, sober, just, holy, temperate; Holding fast the faithful word as he hath been taught, that he may be able by sound doctrine both to exhort and to convince the gainsayers.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Scott Berkun. He said, “I think leadership comes from integrity — that you do whatever you ask others to do. I think there are non-obvious ways to lead. Just by providing a good example as a parent, a friend, a neighbor makes it possible for other people to see better ways to do things. Leadership does not need to be a dramatic, fist in the air and trumpets blaring, activity.”

Our topic today is part 6 of “Chapter 3: Reality — Keep it Real” from “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning. He continues as follows:

INFORMALITY

The eleventh commandment (Keep it real) applies not only to substance but also to style. Members of the early church “broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts”. Often, being real means taking a less-formal approach.

One of our first approaches to assimilating people into small groups at CTK was a demonstration of Deliberate Simplicity. CTK first met in a rented Elks Lodge in Mount Vernon, Washington. On an auditorium wall was an elk’s head. In the early months, after each service I would ask those who were new to meet me under the elk’s head. Folks would gather with me, and we would make some brief introductions. I would then ask if anyone would be available to facilitate a new small group, and if someone would be willing to open their home for the group to meet. Invariably, I would get a positive response. Then I would ask if we could meet that week, say on Wednesday. I’d ask everyone to exchange phone numbers on the spot, and I’d tell them I’d see them at the host’s home that week. To this day, we have never developed a better assimilation strategy than those cheesy, impromptu “under the elk’s head” meetings.

Our Scripture verse on preaching is 2 Timothy 4:2 which reads: “Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all long suffering and doctrine.”

Our quote on preaching today is from Jerry Bridges. He said, “Preach the Gospel to yourself every day.”

Today, our topic is titled “The Qualifications of the Preacher, Part 26” from “The Preacher and his Preaching” by Alfred P. Gibbs.

This section is titled: HE MUST BE FIT FOR THE WORK (PART 11)

As preachers, we must recognize that our bodies, too, are the Lord’s. The Bible puts it thus, “Now the body is not for fornication, but for the Lord and the Lord for the body.” The Christian’s body belongs to the Lord, as does everything else pertaining to him. Nothing could be plainer, “Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, which is in you, which ye have of God and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God’s.”

Seeing that our bodies do not belong to us, but that we are merely tenants in them for the duration of our lifetime on earth, what should our attitude be in regard to our bodies? The Word of God leaves us in no doubt as to the answer. We are urged, first of all, to yield our bodies for a righteous life. “Yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members [i.e., hands, feet, tongue, etc.] as instruments of righteousness unto God.”