Ultimately, if the job is not done, goals are not reached, and the team does not win, then the leader is not doing his job well, because, as Dr. Lee Robinson or John Maxwell said, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” The simple purpose of this podcast is to help those who are called to the ministry define what leadership is and how they can effectively lead others to do great things for the glory of God in the world. As the father of modern missions, William Carey said, “Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God.”

Our Bible passage for this episode is Luke 9:48 which says, “[Jesus] being the brightness of [God’s] glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high.”

Our quote for this episode is from Gary Wills. He said, “The leader is one who mobilizes others toward a goal shared by leaders and followers. Leaders, followers and goals make up the three equally necessary supports for leadership.”

Our topic today is Part 4 of “Chapter 3: The Leader’s Preparation: How God Develops Leaders” from Spiritual Leadership: Moving People On To God’s Agenda by Henry and Richard Blackaby. He continues:

Secular leaders were not the only ones shaped by difficult childhoods. Many religious leaders were profoundly influenced by their dysfunctional homes and turbulent upbringings. J. Frank Norris, the infamous pastor of First Baptist Church, Fort Worth, provides a classic example. Not only was Norris pastor of the Fort Worth congregation from 1909 until 1952; he also simultaneously led Temple Baptist Church in Detroit for fourteen years beginning in 1935. During that time, more than twenty-five thousand people joined his Texas and Michigan churches. Norris was a leading figure among fundamentalists. He published his own widely distributed paper, The Fundamentalist, and was considered a spellbinding preacher. Yet many people wondered why Norris experienced such a stormy ministry. His house and his church both burned down and in both cases Norris was accused of arson. He was constantly embroiled in controversy, haranguing everyone with whom he disagreed. He sued his own congregation. Norris even shot a man to death in his church office. To comprehend Norris’s flamboyant and vindictive leadership style, one must consider his childhood. When Norris was a young boy his father, an alcoholic, beat him mercilessly. Two gang members showed up at the Norris home and began shooting at his father. The young boy charged the two ruffians with a knife. He was shot three times. Norris was raised in poverty and turmoil.


This podcast teaches every Bible-believing Christian how to preach the Gospel by any means necessary in many different settings, including using the internet and the new “podcast pulpit”.

Our Scripture passage on preaching is Acts 9:19-21 which reads: “Then was Saul certain days with the disciples which were at Damascus. And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues, that he is the Son of God. But all that heard him were amazed, and said; Is not this he that destroyed them which called on this name in Jerusalem, and came hither for that intent, that he might bring them bound unto the chief priests?”

Our quote on preaching today is from Francois Fenelon. He said, “I would have every minister of the Gospel address his audience with the zeal of a friend, with the generous energy of a father, and with the exuberant affection of a mother.”

Today, our topic is titled “Tools of the Trade, Part 14” from “Biblical Preaching” by Haddon W. Robinson.

A series of different questions must be raised when trying to understand a story. A sampling of those questions might be the following:

– Who are the characters in the story and why did the author include them?
– Do the characters contrast with one another?
– How do these characters develop as the story develops?
– What does the setting contribute to the story?
– What structure holds the story together and provides its unity?
– How do the individual episodes fit into the total framework?
– What conflicts develop and how are they resolved?
– Why did the writer bother telling the story?
– What ideas lie behind the story that may be implied but not stated?
– Can those ideas be stated through a subject and complement?

Much of the Old Testament is poetic in form. In reading translations that print poetry as poetry and not as prose, we discover that poetry is the most-used literary form in Old Testament literature. Even sections we ordinarily think of as prose (history, prophecy, Wisdom literature) contain large amounts of poetry. Poets do not usually tell stories but instead express feelings and reflections about life. In Hebrew literature poets communicate through parallelism that repeats, contrasts, or adds to the previous thoughts, and they use figurative language that may not be true to fact but is true to feelings. Images and figures of speech give more life and force to speech because they join experience to fact. When farmers observe that “the land needs rain,” they are true to fact, but if they say that “the earth thirsts for rain,” they are true to both fact and feeling. Poets major in structures and language to add force and depth to what they are saying.


Daniel Whyte III
Daniel Whyte III

The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Hebrews 12:2 which says, “Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Bill Gates. He said, “As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.”

In this podcast, we are going through the fine books: “Advanced Strategic Planning: A New Model for Church and Ministry Leaders” by Aubrey Malphurs, “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning, and “Humilitas: A Lost Key to Life, Love, and Leadership” by John Dickson. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to purchase a copy of these books from our website podcastpulpit.com.

Our topic today is part 2 of “Chapter 4: Developing a Biblical Mission: What We Are Supposed to be Doing” from “Advanced Strategic Planning: A New Model for Church and Ministry Leaders” by Aubrey Malphurs. He continues as follows:

— The Mission Inspires Ministry

Unity Scripture is clear about the importance of unity among Christians. In John 17:20-23 the Savior prays for you and me and all who believe in Christ to be one. The result of this unity is that the world we seek to reach will believe that the Father has truly sent the Son. Paul stresses the importance of Christian unity in the local church. In Ephesians 4:3 he urges the church to “make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.”

Unity is another function of a well-constructed, shared statement of intent or mission. A clear direction communicates a unifying theme to all the members and draws them together as a team or community. It broadcasts, “Here is where we are going. Let’s all pull together and with God’s help make it happen.” Thus it serves to get everyone on the same page. At the same time it encourages those with a different intent or another ministry agenda to look elsewhere. Just think of what your people could accomplish if everyone agreed with what you are trying to do!

— The Mission Shapes the Strategy

A dynamic mission tells the church where it is going. It is the strategy, however, that gets it there. Though the two are mutually dependent, the mission leads and shapes the church’s strategy. The mission tells what, and the strategy tells how. The mission always comes first— it is found at the front end of the strategy. The strategy is only as good as the mission that directs it. If you do not know where you are going, then any expressway or any body of water will take you there.

What amazes me is that so many churches today have a strategy, as expressed in their programs, but they have a vague, unclear mission. This does not make sense. Peter Drucker writes, “Strategy determines what the key activities are in a given business. And strategy requires knowing ‘what our business is and should be.’”

— The Mission Enhances Ministry Effectiveness

When the people understand what the church is trying to accomplish, they become more effective in their efforts. Drucker has observed the effectiveness of a corporate mission in the marketplace: “That business purpose and business mission are so rarely given adequate thought is perhaps the most important single cause of business frustration and business failure. Conversely, in outstanding businesses…, success always rests to a large extent on raising the question ‘What is our business?’ clearly and deliberately, and on answering it thoughtfully and thoroughly.”

If you took time to investigate effective, God-honoring churches across North America, large or small, you would discover that each has a significant, well-focused mission. They know what business they are in. This is because all good performance starts with a clear direction. People who know where they are going are more willing to go the extra mile.

— The Mission Ensures an Enduring Organization

It is rare that any one pastor lasts the entire time that a spiritually healthy church exists. Pastors come and they go. This is not necessarily bad. Once a pastor reaches retirement age, he serves his ministry best by leaving. This may be sad, but it makes room for a younger person who will be more in touch with the current culture and the ministry paradigms that God is blessing.

The goal of every ministry leader should be to leave behind a mission that will continue after he is gone. The mission, like the values, must not change appreciably over time. It is the Great Commission regardless of who is the pastor. A biblical, dynamic mission can help ensure the continuity of an enduring and great church.

If the Lord tarries His Coming and we live, we will continue this topic in our next podcast.

————

— PRAYER —

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, here’s how.

First, accept the fact that you are a sinner, and that you have broken God’s law. The Bible says in Romans 3:23: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.”

Second, accept the fact that there is a penalty for sin. The Bible states in Romans 6:23: “For the wages of sin is death…”

Third, accept the fact that you are on the road to hell. Jesus Christ said in Matthew 10:28: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” Also, the Bible states in Revelation 21:8: “But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.”

Now this is bad news, but here’s the good news. Jesus Christ said in John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can live eternally with Him. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will.

Romans 10:9-13 says, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

God bless.


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.


Ultimately, if the job is not done, goals are not reached, and the team does not win, then the leader is not doing his job well, because, as Dr. Lee Robinson or John Maxwell said, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” The simple purpose of this podcast is to help those who are called to the ministry define what leadership is and how they can effectively lead others to do great things for the glory of God in the world. As the father of modern missions, William Carey said, “Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God.”

Our Bible passage for this episode is Luke 9:48 which says, “And Jesus unto them, Whosoever shall receive this child in my name receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me receiveth him that sent me: for he that is least among you all, the same shall be great.”

Our quote for this episode is from Michael McKinney. He said, “Authority should be seen as a part of leadership, not as a way around it.”

Our topic today is Part 6 of “Chapter 2: Connecting is All About Others” from Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, by John Maxwell. He continues:

Whenever people take action, they do so for their reasons, not yours or mine. That’s why we have to get on their agenda and try to see things from their point of view. If we don’t, we’re just wasting their time and ours.

Several years ago I spent a few days in New York City visiting some of the nation’s top book publishers with Sealy Yates, my agent, and several key members of my team. Our goal was to receive a new book contract. Prior to meeting with the publishers, we spent a great deal of time discussing what we thought would be important to the executives we’d be meeting. Sealy briefed us on what was going on in the industry and gave us insight on individual publishing houses. One of the members of my staff went over key points he thought were important from my company’s point of view. And we all asked questions and sought answers. We wanted to be well prepared.

The night before we were to have our first meeting, I spent some time alone in my hotel room mentally preparing for the next day. The questions I kept asking myself were these: If I were a publisher talking to an author, what would I want to know? If I were in their position, what would I ask John Maxwell? I believed that if I could answer those questions, there would be a good chance that I would be able to connect with them and be offered a good contract.


Ultimately, if the job is not done, goals are not reached, and the team does not win, then the leader is not doing his job well, because, as Dr. Lee Robinson or John Maxwell said, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” The simple purpose of this podcast is to help those who are called to the ministry define what leadership is and how they can effectively lead others to do great things for the glory of God in the world. As the father of modern missions, William Carey said, “Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God.”

Our Bible passage for this episode is Daniel 6:4 which says, “Then the presidents and princes sought to find occasion against Daniel concerning the kingdom; but they could find none occasion nor fault; forasmuch as he was faithful, neither was there any error or fault found in him.”

Our quote for this episode is from Max DePree. He said, “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant.”

In this podcast, we are using three books as our texts: Spiritual Leadership: Moving People On To God’s Agenda by Henry and Richard Blackaby; Next Generation Leader, by Andy Stanley; and Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, by John Maxwell.

Our topic today is Part 5 of “Chapter 2: Connecting is All About Others” from Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, by John Maxwell. He continues talking about the three questions people are asking about you:

2. “CAN YOU HELP ME?”

One evening Tom Arington and I were having dinner, and I asked him questions about his success in business. Tom is the founder and CEO of Prasco, an independent pharmaceutical company. He told me he owed his success to one question he has always asked in any and every situation: “Can I help you?” By helping others, he has also helped himself. “Whenever people have a heart to do better,” said Tom, “I help them if I can. What I found is that as I lifted others to a higher level, they lifted me up also.”

There’s an old saying in sales: nobody wants to be sold, but everyone wants to be helped. Successful people who connect with others always keep in mind that others are always asking themselves, “Can this person help me?” One of the ways they answer that question is to focus on what benefits they can offer someone.

In his book Presenting to Win, Jerry Weissman points out that when people communicate, they focus too much on the features of their product or service instead of answering the question, “Can you help me?” The key, says Weissman, is to focus on benefits, not features. He wrote: “A Feature is a fact or quality about you or your company, the products you sell, or the idea you’re advocating. By contrast, a Benefit is how that fact or quality will help your audience. When you seek to persuade, it’s never enough to present the Features of what you’re selling; every Feature must always be translated into a Benefit. Whereas a Feature may be irrelevant to the needs or interests of your audience, a Benefit, by definition, is always relevant.”


This podcast teaches every Bible-believing Christian how to preach the Gospel by any means necessary in many different settings, including using the internet and the new “podcast pulpit”.

Our Scripture Verse on preaching is Titus 3:9 which reads: “But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.”

Our quote on preaching today is from Andy Stanley. He said, “Every time I stand to communicate, I want to take one simple truth and lodge it in the heart of the listener. I want them to know that one thing and know what to do with it.”

Today, our topic is titled “The Qualifications of the Preacher, Part 29” from “The Preacher and his Preaching” by Alfred P. Gibbs.

— The need for sane and sound thinking.

In the letter to Titus, Paul emphasizes this necessity for soundness. In it he refers to “sound doctrine.” He speaks of the need to be “sound in the faith.” He points out how necessary it is to maintain the things “which become sound doctrine.” He advises the use of “sound speech that cannot be condemned.” Sound speech comes from sound thinking, hence the necessity for a preacher to be able to think sanely and soberly.

A preacher, of all people, ought to be able to think his way clearly through a proposition and come to a sensible conclusion of what he has read or heard. Mental alertness is surely an essential requisite for a preacher. He is occupied with the loftiest and the most sublime of all truths: the great doctrines of God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, sin, Salvation and the eternal weal or woe of humanity. How great, therefore, is the need for this ability to think sanely, soberly and reverently on these subjects. He should also be a man of vigorous imagination, who can see, in nature and history, illustrations of the truth he wishes to apply to the hearer. It must ever be kept in mind that God does not want His people to be weak-kneed, weak-handed, weak-hearted or, least of all, weak-headed!


Daniel Whyte III
Daniel Whyte III

The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Ezra 7:10 which says, “Ezra had prepared his heart to seek the law of the Lord, and to do it, and to teach in Israel statutes and judgments.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Aristotle. He said, “He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.”

In this podcast, we are going through the fine books: “Advanced Strategic Planning: A New Model for Church and Ministry Leaders” by Aubrey Malphurs, “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning, and “Humilitas: A Lost Key to Life, Love, and Leadership” by John Dickson. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to purchase a copy of these books from our website podcastpulpit.com.

Our topic today is part 1 of Chapter 8: “Persuasion: How Character Determines Influence” from “Humilitas: A Lost Key to Life, Love, and Leadership” by John Dickson. He continues as follows:

THERE IS PERHAPS SOMETHING ODD OR EVEN unseemly in writing a chapter on the way humility influences others. Isn’t humility essentially about serving the interests of others? Why would you “use” humility to get your way with someone?

That’s a fair question, and I have two responses. First, influence is not bad in itself. If I sincerely believe that an individual or organization is best served by moving in a new direction, influencing becomes an instrument of care. Parents influence their kids for their good. Close friends influence each other to protect them from potential mistakes. Military commanders influence their men in order to keep them out of harm’s way. Second, whether or not we think that influencing others contradicts humility, it is a simple observational reality that the humble are frequently more persuasive and inspiring than the arrogant. It is just a weird reality, as I hope to show, that humility does influence.

— How Leadership Works (Again)

Fundamental to influence is persuasion, and, as I argued in chapter 2, persuasion is at the core of leadership. I noted earlier that there are four tools of leadership. First is simple ability. Good leaders have nearly always excelled in some particular area before their move into general leadership. Football coaches were usually decent players in a former life. Business executives typically had success in one or another department of a firm. Senior pastors nearly always started kicking goals in youth work or pastoral care. Ability matters.

The second (and least useful) tool is structural authority, that is, the powers given to the leader by the organization—the power to hire and fire, the power to spend money, and so on. Since authority is not inherent but derived, good leaders know to use structural power sparingly.

The third and fourth tools of leadership I offered earlier are intimately related. Example is the leader’s embodiment of integrity and authenticity. Without a life example that speaks louder than words, even the most persuasive leader will fail. People may be moved by insightful and well-crafted words, but they quickly lose confidence in the persuader if it becomes apparent that “She’s all talk!” Finally, persuasion is the leader’s ability to articulate and argue a position in a way that motivates others in the team to move in the new direction. A leader with example but with no ability to persuade others will be well loved but unable to lift people beyond the circumstances they can see around them. Persuasion is key.

If the Lord tarries His Coming and we live, we will continue this topic in our next podcast.

————

— PRAYER —

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, here’s how.

First, accept the fact that you are a sinner, and that you have broken God’s law. The Bible says in Romans 3:23: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.”

Second, accept the fact that there is a penalty for sin. The Bible states in Romans 6:23: “For the wages of sin is death…”

Third, accept the fact that you are on the road to hell. Jesus Christ said in Matthew 10:28: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” Also, the Bible states in Revelation 21:8: “But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.”

Now this is bad news, but here’s the good news. Jesus Christ said in John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can live eternally with Him. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will.

Romans 10:9-13 says, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

God bless.


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.


Ultimately, if the job is not done, goals are not reached, and the team does not win, then the leader is not doing his job well, because, as Dr. Lee Robinson or John Maxwell said, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” The simple purpose of this podcast is to help those who are called to the ministry define what leadership is and how they can effectively lead others to do great things for the glory of God in the world. As the father of modern missions, William Carey said, “Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God.”

Our Bible passage for this episode is Galatians 5:16-18 which says, “This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh: and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would. But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law.”

Our quote for this episode is from Paul R. Lawrence. He said, “Humans will probably always need the help of especially gifted moral leaders in order to extend the bonds of caring and trust beyond the easy range of the family and the face-to-face community. Such bonds have become essential to the future of humanity.”

In this podcast, we are using three books as our texts: Spiritual Leadership: Moving People On To God’s Agenda by Henry and Richard Blackaby; Next Generation Leader, by Andy Stanley; and Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, by John Maxwell.

Our topic today is Part 4 of “Chapter 2: Connecting is All About Others” from Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, by John Maxwell. He continues:

A MATTER OF CONNECTION

A couple of years ago, I spoke at an international conference in Dubai hosted by a company founded by Nabi Saleh. Nabi is an expert when it comes to coffee and tea. He began his career in 1974 working with tea and coffee plantations in Papua New Guinea, helping them with marketing and manufacturing, and has been active in that industry ever since, particularly in Australia. In 1995, he visited a coffee shop chain in the United States called Gloria Jean’s that was begun by Gloria Jean Kvetko in Chicago. Nabi and his business partner Peter Irvine had such a high opinion of it that they secured the rights to open shops in Australia. In 1996, they opened two Gloria Jean’s locations in Sydney, but they struggled.

They looked to their customers for the answer, and soon they figured it out. “We based our stores on the U.S. model,” says Nabi, “which was totally un-Australian. People loved the coffee, they loved the product, but they said, ‘Where are the seats, where is the food?’ It was a take away concept. We knew if we kept going like that we would not be in partnership too much longer. So we started to reformat.”

They spent nearly two years tweaking their shops, refining and polishing the stores until they connected with their customers. That’s when Nabi and Peter began franchising. In ten years’ time, they opened more than 300 stores. In 2005, they bought the international rights to Gloria Jean’s Coffees and expanded beyond the borders of Australia and the United States. Today Gloria Jean’s has 470 stores in fifteen countries around the world.

Despite his business success, Nabi keeps everything in perspective. When we were at the conference together, Nabi told me, “We aren’t in the coffee business, serving people. We’re in the people business, serving coffee!’

Nabi gives this advice to people in the service industry: “You have to have a service heart. You have to be prepared to serve the needs of those people you come into contact with. At all times it is to look at what it is the customer wants. It’s not what I want, or what Peter wants, it’s the person paying the dollars who is keeping us all going.” In other words, you have to remember that it’s all about others. That’s what it takes to succeed.


This podcast that teaches every Bible-believing Christian how to preach the Gospel by any means necessary in many different settings, including using the internet and the new “podcast pulpit”.

Our Scripture Verse on preaching is Luke 8:1 which reads: “And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him.”

Our quote on preaching today is from Richard Salter Storrs. He said, “Always carry with you into the pulpit a sense of the immense consequences which may depend on your full and faithful presentation of the truth.”

Today, our topic is titled “The Preacher’s Private Prayer, Part 3” from “Lectures to My Students” by Charles Spurgeon.

The best and holiest men have ever made prayer the most important part of pulpit preparation. It is said of M’Cheyne, “Anxious to give his people on the Sabbath what had cost him somewhat, he never, without an urgent reason, went before them without much previous meditation and prayer.

His principle on this subject was embodied in a remark he made to some of us who were conversing on the matter. Being asked his view of diligent preparation for the pulpit, he reminded us of Exodus 27:20. Beaten oil–beaten oil for the lamps of the sanctuary.’ And yet his prayerfulness was greater still. Indeed, he could not neglect fellowship with God before entering the congregation. He needed to be bathed in the love of God. His ministry was so much a bringing out of views that had first sanctified his own soul, that the healthiness of his soul was absolutely needful to the vigor and power of his ministrations. “With him the commencement of all labor invariably consisted in the preparation of his own soul. The walls of his chamber were witnesses of his prayerfulness and of his tears, as well as of his cries.” Prayer will singularly assist you in the delivery of your sermon; in fact, nothing can so gloriously fit you to preach as descending fresh from the mount of communion with God to speak with men. None are so able to plead with men as those who have been wrestling with God on their behalf.


The simple purpose of this podcast is to help Christian leaders understand how planning and strategizing is important to carrying out the Great Commission.

Our Strategic Christian Leadership Bible verse for this episode is Jeremiah 29:11 which says, “For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.”

Our Strategic Christian Leadership quote for this episode is from Nelson Mandela. He said, “A leader is like a shepherd. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind.”

Our topic today is part 10 of “Chapter 3: Reality — Keep it Real” from “Deliberate Simplicity: How the Church Does More by Doing Less” by Dave Browning. He continues as follows:

What might keep a pastor doing the ministry himself instead of seeing that the ministry gets done?

In this model, the pastor gets to come down off his pedestal and be a real person too. The pastor, like the others, wears an ingredients label that reads, “Dust and Divine Spit.” He is made out of the same stuff and faces the same life issues. He has an important role, but he is not on a different level. He is free to be who he is in Christ. The weight of the church is not on his shoulders alone. When every believer is a minister, it creates a healthier body.

Jesus intended not to build a religious organization but to start a movement of real people to transform the spiritual landscape. Religious people and systems have always made things complicated for God. Religious institutions trend toward conformity and control. Instead of empowering people, they enslave them.

While some church movements found their impetus in special revelation, the Deliberate Simplicity movement is grounded in common sense. Common sense is also a gift from God; it’s just widely distributed. And maybe because it is so common, it is not esteemed (familiarity breeds contempt). Deliberate Simplicity celebrates commonsense solutions.